University Policies and Procedures

Student Conduct and Responsibilities

Code of Student Conduct, Committee on Academic Misconduct and Plagiarism

Students who enroll at Ohio State agree to abide by the Code of Student Conduct. Each student is responsible for becoming familiar with the rules and regulations of The Ohio State University. The Office of Student Judicial Affairs has prepared the following synopsis of the Code of Student Conduct: “The code exists to protect the persons, their rights and the property of the University community. The code applies to the conduct of all students and registered student organizations while on University premises; while on professional practice assignment; on assignment which is associated with academic course requirements; or while involved with a University-related activity or a registered student organization activity. There are certain types of conduct which may lead to disciplinary action against a student or student organization in addition to criminal charges in some cases.”

Student Conduct also refers to academic integrity in coursework. The Committee on Academic Misconduct (COAM) discusses behaviors included under academic misconduct in its Frequently Asked Questions.  COAM also provides a list of Ten Suggestions for Preserving Academic Integrity to give students a basis on which to base their conduct. Furthermore, additional information on what accounts for plagiarism and how to avoid it can be found on the COAM site. Finally, some instructors have begun using Turnitin as part of their coursework submission requirements and include a Carmen Dropbox folder for this process. The Turnitin Suite provides OriginalityCheck, GradeMark, and PeerMark as a way to review the originality of students work in comparison to the work submitted by others.

Know Your Responsibilities

  • You are ultimately responsible for the courses you enroll and/or meeting the requirements of your desired program or prerequisites.
  • You are responsible for knowing your current schedule. You can find this at BuckeyeLink.
  • You are responsible for knowing whether or not you are on a waitlist. You can find this at BuckeyeLink.
  • You are responsible for checking your schedule and statement of account regularly to see if you have been added to a class from the waitlist. You will not be added to any classes from the waitlist after the first Friday of classes (after the first day of 4-week session classes).
  • You are responsible for officially dropping courses you have stopped attending.
  • You are responsible for checking your campus email regularly. The university and its colleges and departments send official notices and information to your lastname.#@osu.edu email account. Advisors can only send advising information to your Ohio State account. If you choose to have your email forwarded to another email account, you may not receive official Ohio State mail, including scheduling, academic progress and graduation information. You are responsible for ensuring your email account is capable of receiving "osu.edu" email and for checking your email account frequently. If you are having problems, contact the IT Service Desk.
  • You are responsible for checking the prerequisites to ALL classes for which you sign up. The web registration system is not programmed to enforce all prerequisites.
  • You are responsible for understanding your tuition and fees and resolving issues with the appropriate office (financial aid, Bursars Office, etc.).
  • You are responsible for knowing the university's policies and procedures, including important dates.
  • You are responsible for the manner in which you interact with members of the university community. Be courteous and respectful in class, meetings, activities and when communicating via phone and email.
  • You are responsible for viewing your grades. Grades can be viewed in your Student Center through BuckeyeLink.

Returning to the University

Returning from Leave of Absence

Any time you do not take courses in autumn or spring semester, you will be placed on a Leave of Absence. In order to reactivate your status as a student within Extended Education, you must complete a Return from Leave of Absence Form. An Extended Education student can request to reactivate your enrollment on the Returning Students page. You will receive an email confirming your submission and a second email after the form has been processed. This form is applicable only to Extended Education students returning to Extended Education.

Reinstatement

Students who have been academically dismissed from the university can petition for reinstatement to the university after waiting for a period of two semesters. Reinstatement is not guaranteed, and simple desire to return is not sufficient support for a petition.

Petitioning students need to prove they are now ready to succeed if they are allowed to return to the university. It is advisable to take academic course work at another institution during your time away from Ohio State to demonstrate that you are capable of succeeding in quality college-level work. See an academic advisor if you are interested in attending another institution to help guide your course decisions for transfer back to Ohio State.

Once a student is approved for reinstatement, the student will be placed on academic probation until their cumulative point-hour ratio reaches 2.0 or above.

The published university deadlines for submitting a reinstatement petition are as follows:

Autumn SemesterJune 1*
Spring SemesterOctober 1*
Summer TermFebruary 1*

* Or the first business day following, if these dates fall on a weekend.

Fresh Start

If you have not been enrolled at the university for a full 5 (or more) years, you may petition to return using the Fresh Start Rule (Faculty Rule 3335-8-261). Students who have a cumulative point-hour ratio (CPHR) under a 2.0 or who have been dismissed from the university may want to petition to use Fresh Start. This will eliminate any deficiency points that you may have earned previously and will let you start at Ohio State with a CPHR of 0.00.

While all courses will remain on your permanent record, only courses in which you received a C- or higher will be counted for credit. Other course work will not be counted for credit towards any requirement, or toward graduation. You will return to Ohio State with a recalculated CPHR of 0.00. Should you become degree seeking, you must complete a minimum of 30 semester credit hours after using the Fresh Start Rule before you are eligible to graduate.

You should meet with an advisor to review the policies and procedures to help you understand the consequences of using the Fresh Start.

Keep in mind that if you are considering applying to graduate or professional schools, or even to other undergraduate programs at Ohio State, their admission processes may look at all of your grades and recalculate the original grade(s) into your total.

Scheduling Classes

Auditing a Course

You may choose to audit a course in order to refresh yourself on the material or to learn more about a subject without wanting to earn a letter grade. Fees are assessed for auditing a course, but no credit hours are awarded. You cannot audit a course and then later take the course for a grade. Auditing a course requires the permission of the instructor and the permission of your college office, through your academic advisor.

Pass/Non-Pass Course

  • You may take a maximum of 30 credit hours of electives on a pass/non-pass (PA/NP) basis.
  • Speak with your advisor to determine eligibility
  • You cannot take general education, major, minor, or prerequisite courses pass/non-pass.
  • You must have a minimum 2.0 cumulative GPA to use the pass/non-pass option.
  • You must request the pass/non-pass grading option using the course enrollment permission form.

Planning Resources

  • Course Offering Bulletin, Course Catalog, Schedule of Classes 
  • Department and College Offices and Web Sites - provide information about requirements, opportunities, etc. and may offer course syllabi for review
  • GE Sheets and Major Information Sheets - can be obtained from the department website or major advisors
  • Degree Audits and Advising Reports (unofficial transcript)
    • Degree Audit shows how the courses you have taken are applied to degree requirements in different majors.
    • Advising Reports are unofficial transcripts that show your academic history in chronological order. This is used as a tool and does not determine your eligibility in degree programs.
  • Schedule Planner is a web-based class scheduling system that allows a student to select courses from the Schedule of Classes, block out “breaks” for studying or work schedules, and check whether there are available schedules that fit those constraints. Schedule Planner is integrated with SIS and is located within your BuckeyeLink

Types of Courses

When you a reviewing the course catalog and class schedule you will notice that classes have an abbreviated course component type next to each piece of the class. Those components let you know what kind of class it is and how it will be taught.

LEC – LEC stands for lecture. Lecture, usually a larger class size where general information is taught to the group.

REC – REC stands for recitation (reh-si-tay-shun). Recitation, generally a smaller subgroup of a larger class where an instructor goes over homework problems, answers questions, administers quizzes, etc.

LAB – LAB stands for lab. Lab, a longer class period where a student completes lab work; this is also used for performing and visual arts studios/ensembles and may be connected to a LEC or REC.

SEM – SEM stands for seminar. Seminar classes tend to be smaller in size and more discussion oriented.

Adding Classes

It is best to finalize your schedule by the first Friday of the semester or session. For a full list of deadlines, visit the web page.

  • You can add a class online by the first Friday of the semester (by the first day of class for a 4-week session class).
  • You can add a class, with instructor permission, after the first Friday and before 5:00 p.m. on the second Friday of the semester (by the first Friday of class for a 4-week session class).
  • After the second Friday of the semester (after the first Friday of a 4-week session class), you cannot add a class except by approved petition. You will need supporting evidence for your circumstances, such as your attendance record. Your petition may or may not be approved.

If the section you are interested in is full, you may be given the option to waitlist for that section. You are added into a class from the waitlist on a "first-on, first-off" basis as space becomes available that fits your schedule. You should attend the first week of classes if your waitlist number is low. The waitlist closes after the first Friday of the semester. You will not be added to any classes from the waitlist after the first Friday of classes (after the first day of 4-week session classes). You are responsible for checking your schedule and statement of account regularly to see if you have been added to a class from the waitlist.

Dropping Classes

Visit the University Registrar’s site for specific dates related to dropping classes/withdrawing from the university. Before you drop, a reduction in hours due to a class drop (or a withdrawal from the university) may affect:

  • Financial aid (including scholarships, grants, loans, Consortium Agreements). Contact the Student Service Center (SSC) to talk with a staff person before doing anything to your schedule.
  • Benefits received under the G.I. Bill (614-247-VETS (8387)).
  • A tuition reduction received when parents work for the university (614-292-1050).
  • Automobile insurance, if you receive discounts for being a full-time student.
  • Health insurance, if you need to be a full-time student to be covered on a parent's policy.
  • Your tuition assistance benefit, if you are a university employee (614-292-1050).

Withdrawal from the University

Before you withdraw from your course work, you should consult with your academic advisor. For questions related to fees and financial aid as a result of withdrawing from classes or taking a leave of absence, please contact the Student Service Center (SSC).

Calculating Your Cumulative Grade Point Average

It is essential for you to know how to calculate your semester point-hour ratio (SEMHR) and your cumulative point-hour ratio (CPHR.) In order to set academic goals, which help lead to success, it is important to understand how success is measured.

Ohio State, like most universities, grades on the four-point scale. An A is worth 4 points, a B is worth 3 points, a C is worth 2 points, a D is worth 1 point, and an E is worth 0 points. Ohio State also has a plus and minus grading system to help make finer distinctions within the A, B, C, D, E scale. 

Grading Scale

GradeCredit Value
A4.0
A-3.7
B+3.3
B3.0
B-2.7
C+2.3
C2.0
C-1.7
D+1.3
D1.0
E0.0

Additional marks which are not included in GPA calculation are:

  • S/U = Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory
  • PA/NP = Pass/Non-Pass
  • EM = Examination Credit
  • K = Transfer Credit
  • NG= No Grade Reported
  • R=Audit
  • I=Incomplete**

(Note: There is no D-, E+ or A+)

** Incomplete grades change to a final grade that will be part of your SEMPHR/CPHR calculation after the final grade posts. It is your responsibility to work with your instructor to understand what needs to be done to complete the course and to establish a timeline for turning in late work.

A student's point-hour ratio is calculated by taking the total number of points earned and dividing it by the number of hours attempted for a grade. First, multiply the credit hour value of each course by the point value of the grade. For example, a three-hour course in which you earn a B (3.0) is worth 9 points. Second, total the points you have earned in all your courses. Finally, divide by the number of hours you have attempted for a letter grade.

Example:

DepartmentCourse #HoursGradeCalculationPoints
English111003A-(3x3.7)11.1
Psych110003B+(3x3.3)9.9
Math114804B(4x3.0)12.0
Political Science110503C(3x2.0)6.0
EXP110001A(1x4.0)4.0
Total 14  43.0

This student's semester point-hour ratio (SEMHR) would be 3.07 (43 points divided by 14 hours attempted.) The student's term point hour ratio and cumulative point-hour ratio (CPHR) would be the same, given that this is the student's first semester of enrollment at

After subsequent semesters at Ohio State, you must calculate the cumulative point hour ratio (CPHR) by dividing total points earned by total hours attempted for a letter grade (not including S/U, PA/NP, EM, or K credit*.) Using our previous example, consider the following grades as the student's second semester at Ohio State:

DepartmentCourse #HoursGradeCalculationPoints
History115103B(3x3.0)9.0
Math114903D(3x1.0)3.0
Theatre210003B+(3x3.3)9.9
EduPaes113901B(1x3.0)3.0
Economics200103A-(3x3.7)11.1
Total 13  36.0

Remember, last semester the student earned a 3.07. The SEMHR for the second semester would be a 2.77 (36 points divided by 13 hours). The student's cumulative point hour ratio (CPHR) would be found by dividing the total number of points earned (43 + 36 = 79) by the total number of hours attempted (14 + 13=27). The CPHR would then be 2.93. By earning these grades and maintaining a cumulative point-hour ratio well above the minimum standard of 2.00 required for graduation, the student in our example is considered to be in academic "good standing.”

Deficiency Points System

The deficiency point system is based upon the point values assigned to the various grades which professors assign to student performance. The point values of the grades are:

GradePoint Value
A4.0
A-3.7
B+3.3
B3.0
B-2.7
C+2.3
C2.0
C-1.7
D+1.3
D1.0
E0.0
EN0.0

The University’s minimum academic standard is a C, which means that the student must average 2.0 on all the courses attempted. This average is computed by multiplying the credit hours attempted by the point value of the grades received.  An A in a 4 credit hour course, for example, would give the student 16 credit points (4 x 4.0).  Since the minimum is only 8 credit points (4 x 2.0), this student would have 8 points more than the minimum.  On the other hand, a grade of D (4 hours with a 1.0) would yield only 4 credit points.  Since 8 points are needed to meet the minimum, the student would be deficient 4 points.

Any grade above a C (C+. B-, B. B+, A-, or A) will remove deficiency points.  Any grade below that minimum (C-, D+, D, E, EN) will add deficiency points unless counterbalanced by surplus points.  A grade of C, the minimum, will neither remove nor add deficiency points.

Example - On a schedule of 13 credit hours, a student earns these grades:

CourseHoursGradePoints
Min. Required13C(13x2.0) 26
English 11103C(3x2.0) 6
Biology 11014D(4x1.0) 4
Psych 11003C(3x2.0) 6
Theatre 21003D(3x1.0) 3
   19

Deficiency Points = 7

The minimum required credit points are 26; this student has earned 19 credit points, so the student has 7 deficiency points.  If the student enrolls in one 4 hour course during the next semester and earns a B (3.0), the student will receive 12 credit points (4 x 3.0), 4 more than the necessary minimum of 8 (4 x 2.0), thereby reducing the 7 deficiency points to 3 deficiency points.

Dean's List

At the end of each semester the Dean’s List is generated for full-time enrolled students who maintained a 3.5 grade point average while taking at least 12.0 credit hours during the semester.

After each spring semester the part-time Dean’s List is generated for part-time students who maintained a 3.5 or better cumulative grade point average and took at least 12.0 credit hours over the course of the three-semester period. The Dean’s List designation is posted to the student’s transcript.

Academic Difficulty

If you are experiencing academic difficulty with courses, you should see your academic advisor as soon as possible to discuss the issues that may be affecting your academic performance and options.

Repeating a Course

Non-degree seeking students may repeat a course for a better grade or to refresh knowledge. Students applying to professional school may need to repeat courses taken more than a specified number of years in order to meet professional program admission qualifications.

You may repeat any course once, regardless of the grade you received when you completed it the first time. If you wish to repeat a course more than once, you will need to meet with your academic advisor to petition for this request. Some colleges with high demand, limited seating courses may have policies on repeating a course.

If you do not qualify for the Grade Forgiveness Rule, both grades will count in your cumulative grade-point average.

Grade Forgiveness

The Grade Forgiveness Rule permits students to petition to repeat up to three courses. The grade in the repeated course will replace the grade for the original course in the calculation of the student’s cumulative point-hour ratio. Only a first repeat of a course can be used this way. A notation of the original grade will remain on the student’s transcript.

Students seeking to invoke the rule must submit a petition to their college offices/enrollment units by the second Friday of the term (or the first Friday of a 4-week session) in which they are repeating the course. Consult with your advisor to discuss policies and your eligibility to invoke the rule.

Keep in mind that if you are considering applying to graduate programs or professional schools, or even to some colleges at Ohio State, all of your grades will be considered in the admissions process (including those forgiven under the Grade Forgiveness Rule), and program or school may recalculate the original grade(s) into your cumulative GPA.

When your cumulative grade-point average falls below a 2.0 you are considered to be in academic difficulty. This can lead to academic warning, probation, or even dismissal. Learn more about university warning and probation.

  • The repeated course must be taken for a letter grade (not as pass/non-pass).
  • Once the student has invoked the rule, the second grade will be used to replace the first, even if the second grade earned is lower. Students who passed the course the first time and fail it the second, will lose credit for the course.
  • A student will not be permitted to invoke the rule after:
    • earning a grade in the repeated course
    • having already repeated the course once
    • having repeated three courses under the rule
  • A student cannot invoke the rule for courses that have been:
    • applied to a degree already awarded by The Ohio State University
    • applied, as transfer credit, to a degree awarded elsewhere

Academic Warning

Per University rule 3335-9-24 (B), “If, at the end of his or her first semester, summer term, or session, a student subject to the provisions of rule 3335-9-23 of the Administrative Code has earned a point-hour ratio below 2.00, he or she may receive a warning from the dean of his or her college or director of his or her school instead of being placed on probation.” Extended Education students in their first semester, summer term, or session, at Ohio State who earn a cumulative point-hour ratio below a 2.00 with 10 or fewer deficiency points will be placed on warning.

The student will receive a letter indicating academic status and a Schedule Lock will be placed on the student account. The student placed on academic warning status who does not raise their cumulative point-hour ratio to 2.0 or greater in their second semester, summer term, or session of enrollment will be placed on academic probation. If the student’s cumulative point-hour ratio reaches a 2.0 or higher the academic warning status will be removed.

Academic Probation

Per University rule 3335-9-25 (A), “Any student whose cumulative point-hour ratio has fallen below a 2.00 shall be placed on probation. The probation shall continue provided the student’s college considers the student’s progress to be satisfactory and shall be removed when the cumulative point-hour ratio has reached a 2.0.” Extended Education students whose cumulative point-hour ratio has fallen below a 2.00 will be placed on academic probation.

Students placed on academic probation will receive a letter indicating their status and a Schedule Lock will be placed on their account. While on academic probation, a student must earn at or above a 2.3 point-hour ratio for each semester, summer term, or session, of enrollment. While on academic probation, if the student earns below a 2.3 point-hour ratio for the semester, summer term, or session, and their cumulative point-hour ratio remains less than 2.0, the student will be eligible for dismissal from the University. Once the student’s cumulative point-hour ratio reaches a 2.0 or higher, the academic probation status will be removed.

Academic Dismissal

Per University rule 3335-9-26, “If the student's college or school considers a student's progress as unsatisfactory in meeting the conditions placed on his or her probation, the college or school shall be empowered to dismiss the student from the university.” Students who are on academic probation and continue to accumulate deficiency points are likely candidates for dismissal. Dismissed students will be notified of their status by letter and e-mail and withdrawn from enrolled courses in the next academic term.

Petitions

Registration Petitions

Students generally pursue a registration petition when an important deadline has passed AND extenuating circumstances have prevented the student from meeting the deadlines. Petitions are not guaranteed, even if you have a situation that prevented you from completing the course. It is IMPORTANT that you ALWAYS talk with and advisor (or someone at the university) if you start to struggle in courses – a petition can be avoided. Be vigilant of the end of the term deadlines regarding specific procedures.

Late Option Petition

The university has established registration deadlines for each term which are published on the University Registrar's site. If extenuating circumstances have prevented a student from submitting the request to register for Audit or Pass/Non-Pass options for a course, the student may petition for approval of a late/retroactive registration for Audit or Pass/Non-Pass options for a course. Poor performance in a course is not sufficient reason for a late registration for Audit or Pass/Non-Pass options.

Over 18 Hours Petition

The default maximum credit hour load is 18 hours. The load limit exists to protect the student and assure successful completion of the courses. This petition would need to be submitted within the course add period, generally no later than the second Friday of the term (or the first Friday of a 4-week session).

Late Enrollment

You may add a class any time before the first Friday of the term, and the second Friday with the instructor’s permission. In this case a Course Enrollment Permission form is required to be completed by the instructor. After the term deadlines a petition will be required.

Retroactive Drop

You may drop a class any time before the first Friday of the term without a financial assessment. After that date the assessment increases to the Last day to drop a class and be assigned a (W) withdrawal grade. The exact consequences depend on a number of factors, including the type and amount of aid you have and the official date on which you drop classes

If you are a University Employee or dependent, you may be required to pay back tuition benefits that you received.

Late Withdrawal Petition

The Ohio State University has established, firm drop deadlines for each term, which are published by the University Registrar. After the established deadline has passed, courses will not be dropped from a student’s schedule unless extenuating circumstances come into play. Petitions are approved for students who demonstrate that extenuating circumstances (medical emergency involving hospitalization, being called up for active military duty, etc.) have arisen that make it impossible/impractical for the student to finish the term’s coursework, AND the extenuating circumstances began AFTER the drop deadline had passed.

Denied Petition Appeal

A student may appeal a denied petition if additional information supporting the petition becomes available or if the student, with the endorsement of the advisor, can substantiate further the original documentation for reconsideration.

Reinstatement Petitions

Students generally pursue a reinstatement petition when they have been dismissed from the university. You must meet with an advisor so you understand the process, as well as what is involved in preparing an effective petition.

The published university deadlines for submitting a reinstatement petition are as follows:

  • Autumn Semester - June 1*
  • Spring Semester - October 1*
  • Summer Term - February 1*

*Or the first business day following, if these dates fall on a weekend.

Denied Petition Appeal

A student may appeal a denied petition if additional information supporting the petition becomes available or if the student, with the endorsement of the advisor, can substantiate further the original documentation for reconsideration.